Havoc and Kaos to patrol Union Twp.; Hooters coming to Eastgate

By Brett Milam - Editor
-

Havoc and Hooters are coming to Union Township, according to the July 12 board of trustees meeting.

Police Chief Scott Gaviglia mentioned in his report that Officer Chris Holden and Union Township’s second K-9, Havoc, are training together in Cleveland and are expected to begin duty toward the end of July.

Training in Cleveland was a six-week course; Havoc joins Kaos, who is handled by Officer Dave Perkins, as the two K-9 units in the township.

Gaviglia also mentioned progress already being made on the contract with Motorola for 9-1-1 services.

“We’re on track to get that moving, that program and project has to be completed by the first of the year and we’re already on it,” he said.

Ken Geis, administrator, said at the June 28 trustee meeting that the contract with Motorola CALLWORKS 9-1-1 Solutions integrated system was a year in the making.

Cincinnati Bell is getting out of the 9-1-1 business, so that necessitated a change in vendors. Geis considered joining in with Clermont County’s 9-1-1 system, but he thinks it serves both entities well to have their own independent stations; for example, so Union Township can be a backup to Clermont County, if their system goes down.

The trustees all approved the motion to switch to Motorola.

Geis noted at the July 12 meeting that this new system will be “state-of-the-art” and have all the amenities associated with communications and direct and record information from people in emergency situations.

Hooters is coming to Union Township, according to Geis. The restaurant chain will open up a location at the former spot of Logan’s Roadhouse, located at 4555 Eastgate Blvd. Logan’s closed in 2016.

“Their footprint is very similar to the Logan’s restaurant,” he said. “And so they have purchased a lot of the sites, particularly in this region, but throughout the country and they’re expanding and looking forward to that site.”

Logan’s was profitable, Geis said, but he said it fell victim to the circumstances of other Logan’s restaurants in the nation not being nearly as profitable.

“Generally speaking, that will be administratively handled. It was a restaurant, it’s gonna be a restaurant,” he said. “They’re probably going to have less signange than Logan’s.”

“Everyone’s been asking for more restaurants, so here we go, it’s a restaurant,” John McGraw, trustee, added.

Activity to get that Hooters operational is expected later this month and once they start, it should take about six months to open, Geis said.

The trustees also passed a resolution to authorize adoption of an alternative method of apportionment of the undivided government fund.

Ohio’s Local Government Fund for 2018-2019 is $381.8 million, of which $2.5 million goes to Clermont County and then that figure is divided up as $1.22 million going to the county and $1.29 million is divvied up among the townships, villages and the cities of Milford and Loveland.

In the latter category, distribution of funds can be based on a statutory formula or an alternative formula agreed upon by the jurisdictions. For about two decades, an alternative formula has been used, reviewed and agreed upon every five years since.

Geis recommended that the trustees essentially signal their interest to the board of county commissioners in an alternative formula by extending the current formula for another year until such a new formula can be determined.

Geis said it’s really the best they could hope for that the city of Milford is considering an alternative method since Milford gets most of the funds currently.

“I think there is an opportunity to maybe enhance our position next year with some of the changes that are going to occur in Clermont County,” he said, adding that Amelia becoming a city with the next census would put a lot of pressure to adjust the formula to make it more equitable.

Trustees also awarded the 2018-2019 Road Salt Contract to Compass Minerals Americas, Inc., as “the lowest responsive and most responsible bidder.”

The price per ton is $80.88 for 2,400 tons or $194,112, which is an increase from last year’s $48.63 per ton.

“I’m really not sure why the price went up so high because I don’t think we had that bad of a winter,” Matthew Taylor, service department director, said. “There’s a lot of people obviously that are confused by it as well.”

Taylor said the salt barn is full right now because not much salt was needed this past winter.By Brett Milam

Editor

Havoc and Hooters are coming to Union Township, according to the July 12 board of trustees meeting.

Police Chief Scott Gaviglia mentioned in his report that Officer Chris Holden and Union Township’s second K-9, Havoc, are training together in Cleveland and are expected to begin duty toward the end of July.

Training in Cleveland was a six-week course; Havoc joins Kaos, who is handled by Officer Dave Perkins, as the two K-9 units in the township.

Gaviglia also mentioned progress already being made on the contract with Motorola for 9-1-1 services.

“We’re on track to get that moving, that program and project has to be completed by the first of the year and we’re already on it,” he said.

Ken Geis, administrator, said at the June 28 trustee meeting that the contract with Motorola CALLWORKS 9-1-1 Solutions integrated system was a year in the making.

Cincinnati Bell is getting out of the 9-1-1 business, so that necessitated a change in vendors. Geis considered joining in with Clermont County’s 9-1-1 system, but he thinks it serves both entities well to have their own independent stations; for example, so Union Township can be a backup to Clermont County, if their system goes down.

The trustees all approved the motion to switch to Motorola.

Geis noted at the July 12 meeting that this new system will be “state-of-the-art” and have all the amenities associated with communications and direct and record information from people in emergency situations.

Hooters is coming to Union Township, according to Geis. The restaurant chain will open up a location at the former spot of Logan’s Roadhouse, located at 4555 Eastgate Blvd. Logan’s closed in 2016.

“Their footprint is very similar to the Logan’s restaurant,” he said. “And so they have purchased a lot of the sites, particularly in this region, but throughout the country and they’re expanding and looking forward to that site.”

Logan’s was profitable, Geis said, but he said it fell victim to the circumstances of other Logan’s restaurants in the nation not being nearly as profitable.

“Generally speaking, that will be administratively handled. It was a restaurant, it’s gonna be a restaurant,” he said. “They’re probably going to have less signange than Logan’s.”

“Everyone’s been asking for more restaurants, so here we go, it’s a restaurant,” John McGraw, trustee, added.

Activity to get that Hooters operational is expected later this month and once they start, it should take about six months to open, Geis said.

The trustees also passed a resolution to authorize adoption of an alternative method of apportionment of the undivided government fund.

Ohio’s Local Government Fund for 2018-2019 is $381.8 million, of which $2.5 million goes to Clermont County and then that figure is divided up as $1.22 million going to the county and $1.29 million is divvied up among the townships, villages and the cities of Milford and Loveland.

In the latter category, distribution of funds can be based on a statutory formula or an alternative formula agreed upon by the jurisdictions. For about two decades, an alternative formula has been used, reviewed and agreed upon every five years since.

Geis recommended that the trustees essentially signal their interest to the board of county commissioners in an alternative formula by extending the current formula for another year until such a new formula can be determined.

Geis said it’s really the best they could hope for that the city of Milford is considering an alternative method since Milford gets most of the funds currently.

“I think there is an opportunity to maybe enhance our position next year with some of the changes that are going to occur in Clermont County,” he said, adding that Amelia becoming a city with the next census would put a lot of pressure to adjust the formula to make it more equitable.

Trustees also awarded the 2018-2019 Road Salt Contract to Compass Minerals Americas, Inc., as “the lowest responsive and most responsible bidder.”

The price per ton is $80.88 for 2,400 tons or $194,112, which is an increase from last year’s $48.63 per ton.

“I’m really not sure why the price went up so high because I don’t think we had that bad of a winter,” Matthew Taylor, service department director, said. “There’s a lot of people obviously that are confused by it as well.”

Taylor said the salt barn is full right now because not much salt was needed this past winter.

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